How To Add Amazing Painted Texture To Furniture

Have you seen all the cool painted texture furniture out there lately? My friend Stephanie with Re-hab To Fab inspired me with her amazing texture technique so I thought I’d try it for myself. I’ve always had this thing for old buildings where the plaster had fallen off with exposed bricks. For this makeover, I have a specific look and a deep meaning behind it. Hanky alert.

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How To Add Amazing Painted Texture To Furniture

I can't wait to show you how adding painted texture can change the whole feel of your furniture. No, this isn’t a cedar chest. That would be sacrilegious. This was a custom build by someone local and a friend purchased this on Marketplace for $40. Score! It’s in great shape and perfect for my idea of painted texture and a never-ending story.

Here is a list of the products used to recreate this look on your furniture.

Prepping The Furniture Before Painting

I always use a primer, stain blocker before I paint. Before you start with any makeover, you must clean and prep the surface before you paint. I use a product called White Lightning (cleaner) to make sure to remove the things you can’t see with the naked eye. It may look clean, but you really don’t want to guess on this part of a makeover. There could be hidden grime and or oils on the surface that could cause the finish to fail.  After cleaning, apply a water-based stain blocker/primer. I used the BOSS on this piece.

Adding The Painted Texture

I adding painted texture to this chest to create a old chippy plaster effect. I started with a neutral base color called Butter Cream. It’s one of my favorites. I painted 2 coats over the entire chest and allowed it to dry overnight. Next, I mixed a texture additive to Gravel Road (Gray) to a consistency of peanut butter.

Using an inexpensive chip brush is probably the best way to add the painted texture. I'll be throwing away this brush when I'm done. With a chip brush, I applied the Sea Spray with the end of my paintbrush, leaving peaks and rough texture. I used a plastic spreader to lightly rub over the texture. Use a light hand when doing this. Your aim is to simply knock down the peaks and leave as much texture as possible.

The Second Layer Of Painted Texture

After the first layer of texture has dried, (overnight is best) mix up a second color of the texture paint in a lighter color. I used the base color Butter Cream. This will create depth in the texture. Apply the Butter Cream texture paint over the first layer in the same fashion and smoothing down the rough peeks with the plastic spreader. Again, this may take another night to fully dry before proceeding to the next step.

Blending Paint

I added a little paint blending with the Butter Cream and Gravel Road around the areas of texture to create a depth look to the texture.

The Decor Transfer For The Win

Adding decor transfers to painted furniture creates a unique look. Now here’s the kicker… find a decor transfer and add it to the areas where the texture wasn’t applied. You can also customize these transfers. Most of them come in sheets, so I cut them out with a pair of scissors to fit where I want them to go. After applying, I simply seal it with a top coat. Make sure your painted surface is dried well before applying the transfer. I will not adhere well if the paint is still damp. Even if it’s dried and cool to the touch. Paint dries from the surface first, so it can take a while to fully dry.

The Never-Ending Story

Recently I visited my Mom who is an avid quilter. Ya, it’s a lost art for sure. She does all her quilts by hand. Every stitch!

We pulled all of her quilts (a lifetime of work) out of a dusty closet where they have laid in silence for so many years. I know I counted at least 20. We laughed and marveled over the beautiful patterns, materials from old clothing (some from my childhood) and talked about all the women in the community (that are now gone to be with their Lord) that had helped stitch these amazing artistic creations. AKA The Quilting Club. A weekly gathering of ladies who share their passion of the all mighty needle and thread.

My Mom The Artist

I told Mom she was an artist and I’ll never forget the look she had on her face. She smiled. It’s one of those moments that you know you’re witnessing something great. A gift from God and the talents she was given to share. Even if it was just with me at that very moment.

I take great pride in my work and the work of another artist. One thing for sure is, the world needs your talents. Whatever it may be. This is my never-ending story.

Would you like to see more of painted texture on furniture? CLICK HERE to learn how to create seamless texture.

Until the next project…

8 replies
  1. Cheryl Atkinson
    Cheryl Atkinson says:

    Do, this is by far my favorite Never Ending Story. It is beautiful and yes, you are an artist.

  2. Victoria
    Victoria says:

    Do, what a beautiful transformation!! I love the words on the chest. I got my first curbside piece a few months ago & used chalk paint on it. But I’d like to photocopy letters my husband & I exchanged over 50 years ago & decoupage them onto the top of this little dressing table.My question is: do I have to have to have them professionally copied onto a special paper for decoupaging?

  3. Donna Dodson
    Donna Dodson says:

    Victoria! That would be amazing! I have not done this but would assume you need to have them copied on a high-quality inkjet printer first. I would be so honored if you would share with me when you have completed your special project. Pinterest is a great resource for info on this subject as well. Best wishes.

    xo, Do

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