Pruning Hydrangeas Before Spring Blooms – Don’t Mess Them Up!

Pruning Hydrangeas Before Spring Blooms - Don\'t Mess Them Up!

It’s that time of year when all the gardening tools get to come out to play. And one of my favorite things to do in the garden is to deadheading or trim back last year’s growth so that all the energy goes back to the plant. Pruning hydrangeas is no exception to this rule. Today, I’m sharing how I prune mine for the best Spring blooms and how not to mess them up. I learned the hard way as usual.

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Pruning Hydrangeas – Last Years Growth

Here in Texas, I start seeing new Spring growth around March on my hydrangeas. It may be a little later for you, depending on the zone you live in. But for me, it’s the perfect time to be Spring pruning hydrangeas. In the past, I tried doing it in the Fall, and every time I did, it stunted the blooms. (insert unhappy face) You want to know why? The blooms are mainly in the new growth. Yes, some blooms will be on old-growth too, but I have found that this works best for me. It can be a real guessing game.

Of course, I prune or deadhead old bloom throughout the blooming season, but today I’m strictly talking about Spring pruning.

Of course, I prune or deadhead old bloom throughout the blooming season, but today I'm strictly talking about Spring pruning hydrangeas. Here's how I do it.

What You’ll Need To Prune Hydrangeas

Purchase a quality pair of pruning shears, and you won’t be sorry. I use mine throughout the year but be sure to clean and oil them regularly. This will also help prevent transferring any plant diseases or bugs you may not see from one plant to another. I clean my blades with alcohol before use.

The Best Time To Spring Prune Hydrangeas

The Best Time For Pruning hydrangeas

For me, I wait until I see the new growth in the Spring, and because we had such a crazy cold winter, I waited extra long to make sure I didn’t over prune. Many of my plants died this past winter, but so far, my hydrangeas are looking great.

Start with the dead stems (easy to spot) and run your hand down the stem until you see the first bud or green growth. This is where you’ll start pruning the hydrangea stems. Sometimes I leave a few dead stems in the middle to help support the new growth and snip off the tops.

Large blooms can really weigh down your bush, and this will give it some stability and help hold up those beautiful blooms.

For me, I wait until I see the new growth in the Spring, and because we had such a crazy cold winter, I waited extra long to make sure I didn't over prune my hydrangeas.
Start with the dead stems (easy to spot) and run your hand down the stem until you see the first bud or green growth. This is where you'll start pruning the hydrangea stems. Sometimes I leave a few dead stems in the middle to help support the new growth and snip off the tops.

Using this method ensures that the new growth is protected when pruning hydrangeas, and since I started doing this, my Spring blooms have resulted in large luscious blooms. As big as my head, if you can believe that.

Using this method ensures that the new growth is protected when pruning hydrangeas, and since I started doing this, my Spring blooms have resulted in large luscious blooms. As big as my head, if you can believe that.

Pruning hydrangeas can be tricky in the Spring. One wrong cut, and there goes your beautiful blooms. I do this every year, and it works!

Of course, these are last year’s blooms, but I know that my hydrangeas are on track to producing a bumper crop this year.

I have plans to preserve some of the blooms for a floral arrangement or to decorate my fireplace mantel with them. I’ll be sharing more on that as soon as I get some good blooms to try it out on. I can’t wait to share that.

Thanks for joining me today, and I hope this answers some questions about pruning your hydrangeas. April showers bring May flowers!

xo, Do

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8 Comments

  • Thanks for the tip on pruning. I live in Minnesota so this blog is perfect timing. I’ll be watching the new growth for when to get pruning. So glad to see survival after your harsh winter. Looking forward to your posts as remake and remodeling get finished.

  • Hi Joanne, I’m so glad you found me, and don’t forget to sign up for my weekly newsletter. That way, you won’t miss a new post. Let me know how this tip on pruning works for you. πŸ™‚ xo

  • Thanks for the tip. Hydrangeas are one of my favorite flowers. We have a fairly new home with new flowerbeds to put all the flowers that make my soul smile.. πŸŒΈπŸ’— we live in Texas. I’ve grown them before, I have made the mistake of pruning them wrong and not getting the beautiful flowers.. Again thanks for the tip.

  • You’re very welcome, Connie. New flower beds make me happy. You have a blank pallet. Have fun! xo πŸ™‚

  • I have 2 hydrangea plants that are at least 68 years old. I dug them up from my grandmother’s house after she had to move to a nursing home. They were on the east side of her house all of my life and I am now 68. I transferred 3 plants, but one died and I can’t seem to get another one to grow there. The other 2 are huge. What is the best way to keep them blooming and what fertilizer do you recommend?

  • Hi Claudia! I love these stories! I have a gardenia that I transplanted from my Grandmother’s yard. It depends on the variety of the hydrangea you have, but I think it’s what they call old-fashioned because of its history. These hydrangeas typically bloom on old wood and will need a general all-purpose fertilizer. Do some research on how to care for old-fashioned hydrangeas. Good luck πŸ™‚

  • Such a helpful blog!!! I have a couple but want to grow my collection when we move to a larger place. I think they are such amazing plants and so many varieties! My Mom last year pruned one by mistake that grow on old wood, a blue one. We only got one bloom. But this year I was watching and now it is just full of buds!!! I am so excited!!!

  • Hi, Melba! I love these vintage flower bushes! Yep, you gotta know what you have before you prune. I have a bumper crop this year. The cold didn’t hurt it all. Thanks for sharing. πŸ™‚

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